A term or expression that is defined in this glossary is marked with the symbol * when used in the Plan.

A term or expression that is defined in the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) and used in the Plan, but which is not included in this glossary, has the same meaning as in the RMA. Definitions provided in the RMA are not repeated in this glossary. A term or expression that is defined in the RMA is marked with the symbol ^ when used in the objectives, policies or rules of the Plan, this glossary and the schedules to the Plan, other than Schedules F, G and I. 

When:
  • * is not used to identify a term anywhere in the Plan, or
  • ^ is not used to identify a term in the objectives, policies or rules of the Plan, this glossary or the schedules to the Plan the term has its ordinary meaning.

Abrasive blasting  means the cleaning, smoothing, roughening, cutting or removing of part of the surface or any article by the use of a jet of sand, metal shot, grit or any other abrasive material propelled by a blast of compressed air or mechanically via a rotary wheel, impeller or other means.
Abundant  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, species that contribute more than most other species to the composition of an area of interest, but are not the dominant* species. This is a measure of the contribution to an area of interest (eg., the same habitat type or forest tier) of a species in relation to other species in the same area, and is not simply a frequency count as both biomass and density of a given species are considered.
Accelerated erosion  means erosion which is caused or accelerated by human activity.
Active bed  means the bed^ of a river^ that is intermittently flowing and where the bed^ is predominantly unvegetated and comprises sand, gravel, boulders or similar material.
Agrichemical  means any substance, whether inorganic or organic, man-made or naturally occurring, modified or in its original state, that is used to eradicate, modify or control flora and fauna. For the purposes of this Plan, it includes agricultural compounds but excludes fertilisers*, vertebrate pest control products* and oral nutrition compounds.
Ambient air  means air outside buildings or structures^. This does not refer to indoor air, air in a workplace, or discharges of contaminants to air that are authorised by a resource consent.
Animal effluent  means faeces and urine from animals other than humans, including associated process water, washdown water, contaminants and sludge, excluding poultry farm litter* or pig farm litter*.
Artificial watercourse  means a continually or intermittently flowing body of fresh water^ that does not meet the definition of river^ in s2 of the RMA. For the purposes of this Plan, it includes an irrigation canal, water^ supply race, canal for the supply of water^ for hydroelectricity power generation and farm drainage canal; but excludes a non-natural lake^.
Association  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, a species, or group of species, landform or soil type occurring in space together. Associations can be observed in geographical pattern across the landscape, or in distinctive community groupings.
At-risk habitat  means an area determined to be an at-risk habitat in accordance with Schedule F and, for the avoidance of doubt, excludes any area in Table F.2(b).
Biofuel  means fuel consisting of a range of biological material derived from plant or animal sources including fats, oils and their derivatives, animal manure, waste* plant material, wood waste*, and waste* treatment plant solids.
Biosolid  means a sewage or sewage sludge, derived from a sewage treatment plant, that does not include animal effluent* or products derived from industrial wastewater treatment plants, and that has been treated or stabilised to the extent that it is able to be safely and beneficially applied to land^.
Bore  a. is created for the purpose of accessing groundwater, oil* or gas; or
b. is created for the purpose of exploring water^, oil* or gas resources excluding piezometers installed for monitoring purposes.
Boulderfield  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, land^ in which the area of unconsolidated bare boulders (greater than 200 mm diameter) exceeds the area covered by any one class of plant growth form. Boulderfields are named from the leading plant species when plant cover is 1% or greater.
Broadleaved  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, woody tree* and shrub* species which flower, excluding the beech species. Common examples of species referred to as broadleaved include, but are not limited to, kamahi, titoki, fuchsia, maire, hinau, tawa, mahoe, and Coprosma species. Broadleaved includes the term “broadleaf”, which is specific and refers to Griselina littoralis or Griselina lucida.
Canopy  means the highest level of foliage within an area of habitat type excluding any emergent individuals. The height of the canopy layer will vary with the structure of the vegetation.
Chimney  means any structure^ or opening designed for venting the airborne products of combustion.
Cleanfill  means a landfill* that accepts only cleanfill material*.
Cleanfill material  means materials such as clay, soil and rock, and other inert materials such as concrete or brick that are free of:

a. combustible, putrescible (except that cleanfill material* may contain up to 5% by weight putrescible matter), degradable or leachable components
b. hazardous substances*
c. products or materials derived from hazardous waste* treatment,hazardous waste* stabilisation or hazardous waste* disposal practices
d. materials that may present a risk to human health
e. liquid waste*.
Coastal foredune  means the strip of land^ between the coastal marine area^ and a line roughly parallel with the beach, extending 200 metres inland of the first line of vegetation.
Commercial vegetable growing  means using an area of land greater than 4 ha for producing vegetable crops for human consumption. It includes the whole rotational cycle, being the period of time that is required for the full sequence of crops, including any pasture phase in the rotation. Fruit crops, vegetables that are perennial, dry field peas or beans are not included.
Common  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, species that contribute more to the composition of an area of interest than species that are scattered* or occasional*, but less than species that are abundant* or dominant*. This is a measure of the contribution to an area of interest (eg., the same habitat type or forest tier) of a species in relation to other species in the same area, and is not simply a frequency count as both biomass and density of a given species are considered.
Common catchment expiry or review date  means the date set in Table 12.1 when all consents within a Water Management Zone* are to be reviewed or to expire.
Composting (or compost)  means the biological treatment or decomposition of organic material under controlled conditions to produce a stabilised product which is potentially beneficial to plant growth with compost as the resulting material.
Continuous  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, that an area of habitat type has no interruption of continuity or conspicuous gaps, allowing for small, infrequent canopy* gaps (eg., tree* fall gaps
Critical infrastructure  means infrastructure^ necessary to provide services which, if interrupted, would have a serious effect^ on the people within the Region or a wider population, and which would require immediate reinstatement. Critical infrastructure* includes infrastructure^ for:

a. electricity substations
b. the treatment and storage of water^ for public supply (excluding the distribution network)
c. the management of human sewage treatment (excluding the reticulation system)
d. strategic road and rail networks (as defined in the Regional Land Transport Strategy)
e. health care institutions including hospitals
Cropping  means using an area of land in excess of 20 ha to grow crops. A “crop” is defined as cereal, coarse grains, oilseed, peanuts, lupins, dry field peas or dry field beans. This definition does not include crops fed to animals or grazed on by animals on the same property.
Cultivation  means preparing land^ for growing pasture or a crop and the planting, tending and harvesting of that pasture or crop, but excludes:

a. direct drilling of seed
b. no-tillage practices
c. recontouring land^
d. forestry*
e. the clearance of woody vegetation* and new tracking* in a Hill Country Erosion Management Area*
Cumulative nitrogen leaching maximum  means the total kilograms of nitrogen leached per hectare per year for the total area of a farm (including any land^ not used for grazing) and is calculated using the values for each land use capability class* specified in Table 14.2.
Cushionfield  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of cushion plants in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the cushion plant cover exceeds that of any other growth form or bare ground. Cushion plants include herbaceous*, semi-woody and woody plants with short densely-packed branches and closely-spaced leaves that together form dense hemispherical cushions. The growth form occurs in all species of Donatia, Gaimardia, Hectorella, Oreobolus, and Phyllachne as well as in some species of Achiphylla, Celmisia, Centrolepis, Chionohebe, Colobanthus, Dracophyllum, Kelleria, Haastia, Leucogenes, Luzula, Myosotis, Poa, Raoulia, and Scleranthus.
Dairy farming  means using any area of land^ greater than 4 ha for the farming of dairy cattle for milk production. This includes land^ used as a dairy cattle grazing runoff but excludes any dairy grazing arrangement. A dairy grazing arrangement is a third party commercial arrangement between the owner of dairy cattle and another landowner for the purpose of temporary grazing.
Discontinuous  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, that an area of habitat type is not continuous* and has distinct interruptions or conspicuous gaps, excluding those gaps created by tree* fall.
Domestic wastewater  means wastewater and greywater generated on the property* from toilets, urinals, kitchens, bathrooms, showers, baths, basins, water closets and laundries. It includes such wastewater flows from facilities serving staff/employees/residents in institutional, commercial and industrial establishments and small schools (under 2,000 l/d), but excludes commercial and industrial wastes*, large-scale laundry activities and any stormwater flows.
Dominant (or dominated)  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, species that contribute more than any other species to the composition of an area of interest. Dominant species are the most characteristic species of the area of interest or habitat type. This is a measure of the contribution to an area of interest of a species in relation to other species in the same area, and is not simply a frequency count as both biomass and density of a given species are considered. Duneland means, for the purposes of Schedule F, areas where the landform is characterised by sand dunes (active or stable).
Endemic  means a species that is indigenous only to a certain area – eg., the Manawatu-Wanganui Region of New Zealand.
Energy efficiency  means a change to energy use that results in an increase in the net benefits per unit of energy.
Erosion and Sediment Control Plan  means a plan prepared in accordance with the “Erosion and Sediment Control Guidelines for the Wellington Region” dated September 2002:

a. In all cases the Erosion and Sediment Control Plan shall include, but not be limited to:

i. a description of the nature, scale, timing, and duration of land disturbance;
ii. water^ run off controls;
ii. methods to prevent slumping of batters, cuts and side castings;
iv. measures to maintain slope stability;
v, methods of sediment retention and control of sediment run off;
vi. methods to avoid effects on riparian margins and waterbodies^;
vii. re-vegetation requirements;
viii. methods to monitor achievement of the plan; and0
ix.  contingency measures for heavy rainfall events.

b. For the purposes of Rule 13-3 (Forestry*), a plan which may either be separate to or form part of an Operational plan* and which is prepared in general accordance with the “Erosion and Sediment Control Guidelines for the Wellington Region” dated September 2002 to the extent that it addresses the matters in Section 8 (Forestry Activities) and that any erosion and sediment control measures employed are in general accordance with the specifications in Sections 4 and 5. The Erosion and Sediment Control Plan* must include, but not be limited to the following:

i. the description of the nature, scale, timing and duration of activities including construction, roading, the formation of any new track*, earthworks, stabilisation and harvesting;
ii. the erosion and sediment control measures to be employed and indicative locations;
iii. detail heavy rainfall response and contingency measures;
iv. identify maintenance and monitoring procedures;
v. identify procedures for review and amendment to the Erosion and Sediment Control Plan*; and
vi. relevant Harvest Plans (including maps and associated text).

Any Harvest Plan in (vi) above must include a Harvest Plan Map and associated text. The Harvest Plan Map must be produced at 1:5,000 up to 1:10,000 scale and must include, but not be limited to, the following:

i. title, date and north arrow;
ii. the harvest area boundary;
iii. any property boundaries in the vicinity of the harvest area,
iv. contours;
v. location of all proposed and existing roads, track*s, landings, firebreaks, stream crossings and associated culverts;
vi. harvesting methodology (hauler or ground-base) and proposed extraction directions;
vii.location of any water bodies^, perennial streams and the bed^ of any lake^;
viii. location of any wetland^ identified in Schedule F and of any trout fishery or spawning rivers^ identified in Schedule B;
ix. location of any rare habitat*, threatened habitat* or at risk habitat* within or adjacent to the harvest area;
x.location of any known historic heritage^ or waahi tapu* sites, outstanding natural features and landscapes, areas of significant indigenous vegetation and habitats of significant indigenous fauna identified in any district or regional plan;
xi.location of slash* management and disposal areas for hauler landings;
xii. location of end haul disposal areas; and
xiii. any other area relevant to managing the harvest area.

The text associated with the Harvest Plan Map must include, but not be limited to, the methods and or management tools employed, or to be employed to meet the standards of Rule 13-3, in particular Rule 13-3(k), (l) and (o) related to slash management.

The method and or management tools shall be in general accordance with Section 8 of the “Erosion and Sediment Control Guidelines for the Wellington Region” dated September 2002. Where there is any conflict between the requirements of Rule 13-3 and Section 8.3.2 (protection areas) and Section 8.4.3 (extraction operations) of the “Erosion and Sediment Control Guidelines for the Wellington Region” dated September 2002, the relevant Rule 13-3 condition(s) must prevail.
Feedpad  means an area of artificially sealed land^ used principally for feeding animals.
Fernland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of ferns in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the fern cover exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground. Tree ferns 10 cm diameter or greater at 1.4 m above the ground are excluded from this definition and are trees*.
Fertiliser  means any substance or mix of substances that is described as or held to be suitable for sustaining or increasing the growth, productivity or quality of plants (or animals indirectly) through the application to plants and soils of:

a. the following major nutrients: nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sulphur, magnesium, calcium, chloride and sodium
b. the following minor nutrients: manganese, iron, zinc, copper, boron, cobalt, molybdenum, iodine and serenium
c. non-nutrient attributes of the materials used in fertiliser
d. fertiliser additives
e. gypsum and lime but does not include biosolids*, animal effluent*, compost* or poultry farm litter* or pig farm litter*.
Fire training  means training undertaken by:

a. the New Zealand Fire Service (or under authority of), or
b. any Rural Fire Authority (or under authority of), or
c. a New Zealand Qualification Authority registered provider accredited for fire training, or
d. the New Zealand Defence Force Fire Service (or under the authority of), including the School of Military Engineering.
Flaxland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, a subclass of tussockland* where species of Phormium are dominant*.
Flood hazard avoidance  means, for the purpose of Policy 9-2, ensuring flood control measures are in place that provide protection from the 0.5% annual exceedance probability (1 in 200 year) flood event and those measures are soundly designed and constructed such that there is minimal risk of the measures failing.
Floodway  means an artificial flood control channel which diverts part of the river's^ flow from the river^ during flood periods and which is identified by the maps in Schedule J.
Flow exceedance percentile  means the river^ flow in m3/s or l/s that is exceeded for the nominated percentage of time, eg., river^ flow is higher than the 50th flow exceedance percentile for 50 percent of the time, but higher than the 20th flow exceedance percentile for only 20 percent of the time.
Forest  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, an area of woody vegetation in which the canopy* cover of trees* and shrubs* is more than 80% and in which tree* cover exceeds shrub* cover.
Forestry  means activities associated with all soil conservation forestry, forestry planted for carbon sequestration purposes or production forestry* including tracking, earthworks, land^ preparation, planting, pruning, thinning, clearing understorey (indigenous and exotic species), and harvesting.

Advice Note: The National Environmental Standards for Plantation Forestry (NES-PF) replace Rule 13-3 of the One Plan for plantation forestry activities.  Please refer to the definition of “plantation forestry and plantation forest” in the NES-PF to check whether the NES-PF applies. 
 
All other forestry activities continue to be regulated under Rule 13-3 of the One Plan.
Grade Aa biosolids  means a high quality biosolid* where the concentration of pathogen and vector attracting compounds has been reduced or removed to provide for contaminant^ concentrations that are at or below the levels specified in Table 4.4 of the Guidelines for the Safe Application of Biosolids to Land in New Zealand, New Zealand Water and Waste Association, August 2003.
Grassland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of grass in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which grass cover, excluding tussock grasses, exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground.
Green waste  means organic material including:
a. vegetative material, but not tree trunks or limbs larger than 100 mm diameter
b. vegetable peelings or trimmings, but no other kitchen wastes
c. soil attached to plant roots that may be physically modified but is otherwise in its natural state

but not including animal products (eg., manure, feathers, carcasses) other than as an occasional or incidental input.
Groundwater Management Zone (GWMZ)  means a Groundwater Management Zone as described in Schedule D.
Halogenated  in relation to hydrocarbons means hydrocarbons with fluorine, bromine, iodine or chlorine attached.
Hand-held appliance  for the purposes of the rules regulating the discharge^ of agrichemicals* and vertebrate pest control products*, means an application technique or method for agrichemical* or vertebrate pest control product* use where the application system is non-motorised, and where spray is being applied that spray is directed only at the target species.
Hapū  means a social, political unit comprised of whānau* each recognising descent from a common ancestor
Hazardous substance  means, unless expressly provided otherwise by regulations prepared under the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996, or the RMA, any substance:

a. with one or more of the following intrinsic properties:
i. explosiveness
ii. flammability
iii. a capacity to oxidize
iv. corrosiveness
v. toxicity (including chronic toxicity)
vi. ecotoxicity, with or without bioaccumulation, and
b. which on contact with air or water^ (other than air or water^ where the temperature or pressure has been artificially increased or decreased) generates a substance with any one or more of the properties specified in (a).
Hazardous waste  means waste* that:

a. belongs to one or more categories in Annex I of the Basel Convention*, and
b. has one or more of the characteristics in Annex III of the Basel Convention*.
Heathland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation dominated* by species that are slow-growing, stunted, with small, hard, scale-like or needle-like leaves with a thick waxy cuticle, and foliage that is flammable, resistant to decay, and produces acid litter. Heathland which occurs on wet substrates (eg., pakihi) comprises a mixture of shrubland* or treeland* with rushlike species, wire rush and ferns.
Herbaceous  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, plant species that do not form woody tissue. Herbaceous species can be annual or perennial.
Herbfield  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of herbs in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the herb cover exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground. Herbs include all herbaceous* species.
High temperature hazardous waster incinerator  means an incinerator that is designed and operated principally for burning hazardous waste* at a temperature greater than 850oC as measured:

a. near the inner wall of the incinerator, or
b. at another point in the combustion chamber where the temperature is likely to represent the temperature in the incinerator.
Hill Country Erosion Management Area  means any area of land^ with a preexisting slope* of 20o or greater on which vegetation clearance*, land disturbance* forestry* or cultivation* and ancillary land disturbance* for the purposes of constructing erosion and sediment control methods to minimize run off to water^ is being or is to be undertaken. Indigenous means, for the purposes of Schedule F, vegetation comprised predominantly of indigenous species, but which may include scattered* exotic species.
Intensive sheep and beef farming  refers to properties greater than 4 ha engaged in the farming of sheep and cattle, where any of the land grazed is irrigated.
Interceptor system  in relation to discharges^ of stormwater, means a facility designed into a stormwater management system with the purpose of:

a. preventing deliberate or accidental releases of any hazardous substances* in the stormwater system, or
b. in the event of stormwater contamination by a hazardous substance*, reducing all such substances in the stormwater prior to discharge^ to concentrations that will not result in contamination of either water^ or sediments to such a degree that is likely to result in significant adverse effects^ on aquatic life^ or on the suitability of the water^ for potable water^ supply.
Iwi  means a political grouping comprised of several hapū*, each recognising descent from a common ancestor(s). The hapū* not only recognise genealogical ties but geographical, political and social ties. Today iwi* are represented by many organisations, including trust boards, rūnanga and iwi authorities^, but only in specific areas where the mandate to do so has been given by the constituent hapū*.
Iwi management plan  means a relevant planning document recognised by an iwi authority^ and lodged with the Regional Council.
Kōiwi  means human skeletal remains.
Land disturbance  (see Vegetation clearance*).
Land use capability class (LUC)  means a classification of a parcel of land^ in terms of five characteristics or attributes (rock, soil, slope*, erosion, vegetation). The land use capability class can be derived either from the New Zealand Land Resource Inventory (NZLRI) or by a suitably qualified person specifically assessing and mapping the land use capability classes for a particular parcel of land^. Where the LUC is assessed by a suitably qualified person, that person may use the more favourable classification of the land^ available applying the 3rd or 2nd edition of the Land Use Capability Survey Handbook
Landfill  means a site* where waste* is disposed of by burying it, or placing it upon land^ or other waste*, but excludes a farm dump.
Lichenfield  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of lichens in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the lichen cover exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground.
Light fuel oil  means petroleum distillate fuel that is used in liquid fuel-burning equipment and does not require preheating.
Maintenance  means all actions which have the objective of retaining or restoring a structure^, system, facility or installation in or to a state in which it can perform its required function, provided maintenance* actions themselves do not give rise to any significant adverse effects^, and where the character, intensity and scale of the adverse effects^ of the structure^, system, facility or installation remain the same or similar.

Maintenance* includes:
a. the reconstruction, alteration, removal or demolition of a structure^ or part of a structure^, system, facility or installation
b. trimming and removal of vegetation encroaching on a structure^, system, facility or installation
c. the erection and removal of a temporary structure^, system, facility or installation
d. the maintenance of access to a structure^, system, facility or installation
e. the maintenance of a track*
MALF  means the one-day mean annual low flow calculated as the average of the lowest flow of the river^ for each year (1 July to 30 June) of record.
Mana  means legitimacy to act in an authoritive and responsible capacity: prestige.
Mauri  means essential life force or principle; a metaphysical quality inherent in all things, both animate and inanimate.
Mossfield  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of mosses in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the moss cover exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground.
Natural capital  means the potential animal stocking rate that can be sustained by a legume-based pasture fixing nitrogen biologically, under optimum management and before the introduction of additional technologies. Using the “Attainable Physical Potential” in stock units/ha for each land unit listed in the extended legend of the LUC* worksheets as a proxy for the soil‟s natural capital, these stocking rates are transformed to pasture production and used in the OVERSEER® nutrient budget model to calculate nitrogen leaching losses under a pastoral use.
New tracking  means the formation of a new track* but excludes:

a. the installation of water table drains and cross-track* culverts for an existing track*
b. tracking undertaken to link existing tracks* or access ways provided the length of linkage tracking is less than 100 m.
New Zealand Threat Classification System and List  means the threat classification systems and threatened species described in any of the following documents:

a. de Lange, P.J., Norton, D.A., Heenan, P.B., Courtney, S.P., Molloy, B.P.J., Ogle, C.C., Rance, B.D., Johnson, P.N. & Hitchmough, R. 2004. Threatened and uncommon plants of New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Botany 42: 45-76.
b. Hitchmough, R., Bull, L., Cromarty, P. (comps) 2007. New Zealand Threat Classification System Lists 2005. Science and Technical Publishing No. 236. Department of Conservation, Wellington.
c. Molloy, J., Bell, B., Clout, M., de Lange, P., Gibbs, G., Given, D., Norton, D., Smith, N., & Stephens, T. 2002. Classifying Species According to Threat of Extinction. Biodiversity Recovery Unit, Department of Conservation, Wellington.
d. Townsend, A.J., de Lange, P.J., Duffy, C.A.J., Miskelly, C.M., Molloy, J., Norton, D.A. 2008. New Zealand Threat Classification System manual. Science & Technical Publishing. Department of Conservation. Wellington.
Noa  means a state of normality or balance.
Nutrient management plan  means a plan prepared annually in accordance with the Code of Practice for Nutrient Management (NZ Fertiliser Manufacturers‟ Research Association 2007) which records (including copies of the OVERSEER® input and output files used to prepare the plan) and takes into account all sources of nutrients for intensive farming and identifies all relevant nutrient management practices and mitigations, and which is prepared by a person who has both a Certificate of Completion in Sustainable Nutrient Management in New Zealand Agriculture and a Certificate of Completion in Advanced Sustainable Nutrient Management from Massey University.
Occasional  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, species that contribute more than scattered* species, but less than species which are common*, abundant* or dominant* and are encountered infrequently within the area of interest. This is a measure of the contribution to an area of interest (eg., the same habitat type or forest tier) of a species in relation to other species in the same area, and is not simply a frequency count as both biomass and density of a given species are considered.
Oil  means petroleum in any form other than gas and includes crude oil, fuel oil sludge, oil refuse and refined oil products (eg., diesel fuel, kerosene, light fuel and motor gasoline).
Operation  means the use of any structure^, system, facility or installation, including ancillary resource use (For the purposes of Chapter 3 only, „ancillary resource use‟ in this definition excludes the discharge of contaminants and the abstraction of water. This exclusion does not apply to ancillary resource use for the purposes of renewable electricity generation or which is permitted by a rule.).
Operational plan  means, for the purposes of Chapter 13, an operational plan to minimise any potential adverse effects^ on any rare habitat*, threatened habitat* or at-risk habitat* resulting from forestry*. The operational plan must be prepared in accordance with Part 3, take into account the Ecological values in Part 2 Section 5, and comply with the Best Environmental Management Practices in Part 1, of the New Zealand Environmental Code of Practice for Plantation Forestry Version 1. (An operational plan may be included within an Erosion and Sediment Control Plan)
Outdoor burning  means the burning of materials other than in purpose-built fuelburning equipment designed to control the combustion process. Outdoor burning includes burning in drums and backyard rubbish incinerators, barbeques, hāngi, umu and outdoor fireplaces.
Persistent organic pollutants (POP)  are organic substances that:

a. demonstrate toxic properties
b. resist degradation
c. bioaccumulate
d. can undergo a long-range transfer in air and water^
e. have a potential harmful effect^ on health or the environment^ including accumulating in living organisms and the food chain.

Examples include pesticides (such as DDT), industrial chemicals (such as polychlorinated biphenyls - PCBs) and unintentional by-products of industrial processes (such as dioxins and furans).
Pig farm litter  means a mixture of spent bedding and solids from pig production sheds which produces no liquid loss when squeezed in the hand.
PM10  means particulate matter that is:

a. less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter
b. measured in accordance with the United States Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 – Protection of Environment, Volume 2, Part 50, Appendix J - Reference method for the determination of particulate matter as PM10* in the atmosphere.
Podocarp  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, southern hemisphere conifer species which have cones modified into fleshy berry-like structures but do not have flowers. Podocarp species include, but are not limited to, the totara species, matai, miro, kahikatea and rimu.
Poultry farm litter  means solid poultry manure, bedding and composted material from poultry farm sheds.
Production forestry  means a forest* of selected species of trees that are specifically planted, managed and harvested for the production of timber or other wood-based products, and includes understorey that has established beneath the canopy* and areas that are demonstrated to be failed plantings from the previous rotation.
Property  means one or more adjacent allotments^ that are in the same ownership. A legal road^ is considered a property for the purposes of this Plan.
Public land  means land^ to which the public has free access at the time that an activity is undertaken.
Public road  means any formed legal road^ that has open public access. It includes both the road area normally used by motor vehicles and cyclists along with adjacent footpaths and any berms and verges not in private ownership
Public water supply  means a reticulated publicly or privately owned drinking water^ supply connecting at least two buildings and serving at least 1,500 person days per year (eg., 25 people for at least 60 days per year). Drinking water^ is water^ intended to be used for human consumption, food preparation, utensil washing, oral hygiene or personal hygiene.
Rāhui  means a social system of prohibition which recognises the tapu state of a resource, or is used as a voluntary device to ensure sensible management of a resource
Rare habitat  means an area determined to be a rare habitat in accordance with Schedule F and, for the avoidance of doubt, excludes any area in Table F.2(b)
Reasonable mixing  in relation to the discharge^ of contaminants^ into a river^ or an artificial watercourse*, means either:

a. a distance downstream of the discharge^ that is the least of:

i. the distance that equals seven times the width of the river^ at the point of discharge^ when the flow is at half the median flow, or
ii. 200 metres from the point of discharge^ or, for discharges^ to artificial watercourses*, 200 metres from the point of discharge^ or the property* boundary, whichever is the greater, or
iii. the point at which mixing of the particular contaminant^ concerned has occurred across the full width of the body of water^ in the river^, artificial watercourse*, or

b. a distance for reasonable mixing* determined as appropriate for a consent application where special circumstances apply.
Rohe  means tribal district or tribal area
Rua kōiwi  means a site* where human skeletal remains are traditionally placed.
Rushland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of rushes in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the rush cover exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground. Rush species include, but are not limited to, some species of Juncus, Apodasmia, and all species of Sporadanthus and Empodisma, but exclude tussock rushes.
Scattered  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, species that contribute less than species which are occasional*, common*, abundant* or dominant* and can be expected to be encountered infrequently, and with a sparse distribution within the area of interest. This is a measure of the contribution to an area of interest (eg., the same habitat type or forest tier) of a species in relation to other species in the same area, and is not simply a frequency count as both biomass and density of a given species are considered.
Scree  means, for the purpose of Schedule F, land^ in which the area of unconsolidated bare rock particles (ranging in size from gravel to cobbles, i.e. from 2 – 200 mm) exceeds the area covered by any one other substrate, bare ground, or growth form.
Scrub  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, an area of woody vegetation in which the cover of trees* and shrubs* in the canopy* is greater than 80% and in which the shrub* cover exceeds that of trees*.
Sea level rise  is the net rise in sea level relative to the land^ of the Region.
Seawater Management Zone  (see Water Management Zone*).
Sedgeland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F, an area of vegetation in which the cover of sedges in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the sedge cover exceeds that of any other growth form or bare ground. Sedge species include, but are not limited to, many species of Carex, Uncinia and Bolboschoenus. Tussocksedges and reed forming sedges are excluded from this definition of sedgeland.
Shrub  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, a woody plant less than 10 cm diameter at 1.4 m above ground.
Shrubland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, an area of woody vegetation in which the cover of shrubs* in the canopy* is 20-80% and in which the shrub* cover exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground.
Site  includes, where in the context it is appropriate, an area or place or river^ reach.
Slash  means any discarded vegetation resulting from forestry* pruning, thinning, clearing understorey, or harvesting.
Slope  is the angle from horizontal and is measured in degrees to an accuracy no less than that achieved by a hand-held inclinometer or abney level.
Solid fuel  means a solid substance that releases useable energy when burnt (eg., wood and coal).
Solid waste  means the combination of domestic, industrial and commercial waste* and is also known as community waste*
Spray drift  means the airborne movement of any sprayed agrichemical* as vapour, aerosol or droplets onto non-target areas.
Supplementary water allocation take  means, in relation to the taking of water^ from a river^, a take granted consent in accordance with Policy 5-17 or any preceding supplementary water^ allocation regime.
Taonga  means all things prized or treasured, both tangible and intangible.
Threatened habitat  means an area determined to be a threatened habitat in accordance with Schedule F and, for the avoidance of doubt, excludes any area in Table F.2(b).
Track  means a formed route for the movement of people, animals or vehicles and includes a road^ but excludes any route formed solely by the walking of people or animals.
Treated timber  means timber treated with preservatives, including boron compounds (except 2-thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole (TCMTB) compounds), copper chromium arsenic (CCA), or creosote, but not including timber treated only with anti-sapstain compounds.
Tree  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, a woody plant with a diameter of 10 cm or greater at 1.4 m above ground and includes a tree fern with a diameter of 10 cm or greater at 1.4 m above ground.
Treeland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, an area of vegetation in which the cover of trees* in the canopy* is 20-80%, with tree* cover exceeding the cover of any other growth form, and in which the trees* form a discontinuous* upper canopy above either a lower canopy of predominantly nonwoody vegetation or bare ground. Treeland* excludes orchard trees. (Note: An area of vegetation consisting of trees* above shrubs* is classified as either forest* or scrub* depending on the proportion of trees* and shrubs* in the canopy*).
Tussockland  means, for the purposes of Schedule F and this glossary, an area of vegetation in which the cover of tussocks in the canopy* is 20-100% and in which the tussock cover exceeds the cover of any other growth form or bare ground. Tussocks include all grasses, sedges, rushes and other herbaceous plants with linear leaves (or linear non-woody stems) that are densely clumped and are greater than 10 cm in height. This includes, but is not limited to, all species of Cortaderia, Gahnia and Phormium (see also Flaxland*) and some species of Chinochloa, Poa, Festuca, Rytidosperma, Cyperus, Carex, Uncinia, Juncus, Astelia, Aciphylla and Celmisia.
Untreated human effluent  means sewage which:

a. has undergone no treatment; or
b. has only undergone changes to its physical properties as a result of: 
i. screening, including milliscreening;
ii. comminution;
iii. grit removal;
iv. settlement; or
v. any combination of the above.
Untreated wood  means any wood material or product, including sawdust, which is not treated with copper chromium arsenic (CCA) (or “tanalised”), or with any organochlorine preservative.
Upgrade  means bringing a structure^, system, facility or installation up to date or to improve its functional characteristics, provided the upgrading itself does not give rise to any significant adverse effects^, and the character, intensity and scale of any adverse effects^ of the upgraded structure^, system, facility or installation remain the same or similar.
Vegetation clearance  means the cutting, crushing, spraying, burning, or other means of removal or destruction of vegetation, including indigenous and exotic plants (including trees). Land disturbance means the disturbance of the land^ surface by any means including by blading, blasting, contouring, cutting of batters, filling, excavating, ripping, root raking, recontouring, or moving or removing soil or earth. Vegetation clearance* and land disturbance* excludes:
a. cultivation*
b. forestry*
c. clearance or disturbance by animals including grazing
d. activities undertaken for the sole purpose of establishing a fence line and not located within a rare habitat*, threatened habitat* or at-risk habitat*
e. the maintenance* or upgrade* of existing tracks*, structures^ (including fences) or infrastructure^
f. maintaining shelterbelts (including cutting of shelterbelt roots)
g. activities associated with fruit tree or fruit vine plantations
h. activities undertaken for the purpose of protecting, maintaining or enhancing areas of rare habitat*, threatened habitat* or at-risk habitat*
i. clearance of vegetation that is fallen or dead and not located within a rare habitat*, threatened habitat* or at-risk habitat* that is forest* or scrub* in Schedule F
j. activities undertaken within the boundaries of any area of land^ held or managed under the Conservation Act 1987 or any other Act specified in Schedule 1 to that Act (other than land^ held for administrative purposes) that are consistent with a conservation management strategy, conservation management plan, or management plan established under the Conservation Act 1987 or any other Act specified in Schedule 1 to that Act
k. activities undertaken within the boundaries of the New Zealand Defence Force Waiouru Military Training Area, provided that those activities are undertaken in accordance with a management plan that has the same or similar outcome as an Erosion and Sediment Control Plan*
l. clearance of thistles, ring ferns, carpet ferns, rushes, ink weed, briar rose, barberry, introduced pampas grass (other than toetoe), mingimingi, wilding pinus species, Japanese poplar, Japanese walnut and pest plants referred to in the Regional Council's Regional Pest Plant Management Strategy.
Vertebrate pest control product  means any substance, whether inorganic, human-made or naturally occurring, modified or in its original state, that is used to eradicate, modify or control vertebrate animals, including possums, rats and mustelids. It includes vertebrate toxic agents as identified and regulated under the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act 1996.
Wāhi tapu  means a site* sacred to Māori in the traditional, spiritual, religious, ritual, or mythological sense and includes rua kōiwi*.
Wāhi tūpuna  means a site* of cultural and historical significance to hapū* or iwi* – though not necessarily in a state of tapu.
Waste  means any material, solid, liquid or gas that is unwanted or unvalued and discarded or discharged.
Water Management Sub-zone or Sub-zone (WMSZ)  means a Water Management Sub-zone as described in Schedules A or I.|
Water Management Zone  means a Water Management Zone as described in Schedule A or the Seawater Management Zone as described in Schedule I.
Water quality target  means an objective or result for water quality towards which efforts are directed. The word “target” in the One Plan does not have the same meaning ascribed to it by the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2011.
Wet abrasive blasting  means abrasive blasting* when water^ or a mixture of abrasive and water^ is added to the airflow carrying the abrasive material prior to the blasting nozzle exit, or when the blasting medium is predominantly a pressurised slurry.
Whānau  means family or extended family.
Whenua  means land.
Whitebait  means the assemblage of juvenile indigenous fish which migrate into river^ systems from the sea, generally during spring. This assemblage can include juvenile inanga, shortjaw kokopu, giant kokopu, banded kokopu, koaro and occasionally common smelt.
Woodburner  means a domestic heating appliance that burns wood, but does not include:

a. an open fire
b. a multi-fuel heater, a pellet heater, or a coal burning heater
c. a stove that is designed and used for cooking and is heated by burning wood
Woody vegetation  means perennial vegetation that has hard lignified tissues